Undefeated African-American Leaders

Looking back on history, many leaders have left an impression on millions of people. Here are 9 of those undefeated dreamers, doers, great geniuses and silent innovators, record-breakers and icons of pride and aspiration who helped change the world.  1. Shirley Chisholm The first African-American woman to serve in the U.S. Congress was Shirley Chisholm, born on 30 November 1924. Chisholm started working with local political groups as an early educator from New York City. In 1964 she secured a place in the New York State Parliament, representing her Brooklyn neighborhood. She was elected to the United States House of

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Martin Luther King Jr. Summary

A CIVIL RIGHTS LEADER PROMINENT FIGURE IN BLACK HISTORY – DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. The African American Baptist Leader and activist Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was the most visible voice and leader in the Civil Rights movement from 1955 until his death on April 4, 1968. King advanced human rights, based on the Christian values and non-violent advocacy of Mahatma Gandhi, through non-violence and civil disobedience. He was the son of Martin Luther King Sr, an early civil rights pioneer. EARLY LIFE King came from a middle class family, steeped in Southern Black ministry tradition.  Baptist preachers were

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Fannie Lou Hamer’s Interview

Fannie Lou Hamer, the daughter of struggling Mississippi sharecroppers, and the youngest of 19, was not actively involved in American civil rights movements until she was 44 years old.  During her fight for her right to vote, Hamer was beaten, stabbed and shot but persisted and became a field secretary to the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC) and became a pioneer in activism in 1963.  She came into national prominence as the cofounder and vice chair of the Mississippi Free Democratic Party.  Her party challenged the Mississippi Democratic Party’s decision to send a white delegation to the National Convention

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Fannie Lou Hamer Speech

One of the great political moments for Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer (in terms of her place on a national stage) was when she spoke at the Democratic National Convention Credentials Committee in 1964.  Her speech not only detailed her life, but highlighted the fierce brutality she faced for simply wanting to practice a basic right as an American citizen.  Below is her speech in its entirety.  Testimony before the Credentials Committee, Democratic National Convention 1964 Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer “Mr. Chairman, and to the Credentials Committee, my name is Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer, and I live at 626 East Lafayette

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Fannie Lou Hamer Quotes

Here is a collection of Fannie Lou Hamer’s memorable, courageous and brave quotes that inspires everyone. Expressing the power of voice 1.     “If I fall, I’ll fall five feet four inches forward in the fight for freedom. I’m not backing off.” – Fannie Lou Hamer 2.     “If the white man gives you anything – just remember when he gets ready, he will take it right back. We have to take care of ourselves.” – Fannie Lou Hamer 3.     “One day, I know the struggle will change. There’s got to be a change – not only for Mississippi, not only for

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Fannie Lou Hamer Sterilization

Fannie Lou Hamer was the 20th child of Lou Ella and James Lee Townsend, and was born in 1917. At the age of six, she joined her family in the cotton fields. While she managed to finish some years of schooling, she was picking hundreds of pounds of cotton a day by adolescence. She married Perry Hamer, known as Pap, in the early 1940s and served alongside him at W.D. Marlow’s plantation near Ruleville, Sunflower County. The skill of Hamer to read and write gave her the timekeeper post, a less physically challenging and more prestigious job in the sharecropping

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Mary Church Terrell Speech

Mary Eliza Church Terrell is considered a living connection between the age of the Declaration and the modern civil rights movement.  She was born in Memphis in 1863 and was active until her death in 1954. Terrell was the first chairman of the Colored Women’s National Association (NACW) which was established in 1896. Terrell makes a stirring plea for unity, activism, and race pride for her first presidential address to the NACW, given in Nashville on September 15, 1897. The following is the speech, written in 1990 in the Library of Congress from its original manuscript: “In Union there is

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Mary Church Terrell Quotes

The same year the Declaration of Emancipation was signed; Mary Church Terrell was born and died two months after the decision of  Brown v. Education Board. During those 90 years, she promoted racial and economic diversity,  especially African-American women’s rights and opportunities. 9 Best Mary Church Terrell Quotes 1-         “And so, lifting as we climb, onward and upward we go, struggling and striving, and hoping that the buds and blossoms of our desires will burst into glorious fruition ‘ere long. With courage, born of success achieved in the past, with a keen sense of the responsibility which we shall continue

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Mary Church Terrell House

The Mary Church Terrell House is a renowned house at 326 T Street NW in Washington, D.C. The birthplace of noted civil rights pioneer Mary Church Terrell, the suffragist and educator, who served as the first President of the Colored Women’s National Association. Her home in the LeDroit Park section of Washington, DC was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1975. The house is a contributing property in the LeDroit Park Historic District. Terrell House sits between 3rd and 4th Street on the south side of T Street, southeast of Howard University. It’s a 2-1/2 story brick building with a

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Mary Church Terrell Delta Sigma Theta

Mary Church was one of the first Black women in the United States to receive a college degree, graduated from Oberlin College with a Bachelor’s degree in classics and master’s degree four years later in 1888. In 1892, Terrell was elected president of the famous Washington, D.C. Black discussion group “Bethel Literary and Historical Society,” the first woman to hold the position. In 1913 Terrell joined the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, which had recently been formed, at Howard University. She was given a degree from Oberlin College in 1948, and an Honorary Degree from Howard and the Universities of Wilberforce.

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