Mary Church Terrell House

The Mary Church Terrell House is a renowned house at 326 T Street NW in Washington, D.C. The birthplace of noted civil rights pioneer Mary Church Terrell, the suffragist and educator, who served as the first President of the Colored Women’s National Association. Her home in the LeDroit Park section of Washington, DC was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1975. The house is a contributing property in the LeDroit Park Historic District. Terrell House sits between 3rd and 4th Street on the south side of T Street, southeast of Howard University. It’s a 2-1/2 story brick building with a

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Mary Church Terrell Delta Sigma Theta

Mary Church was one of the first Black women in the United States to receive a college degree, graduated from Oberlin College with a Bachelor’s degree in classics and master’s degree four years later in 1888. In 1892, Terrell was elected president of the famous Washington, D.C. Black discussion group “Bethel Literary and Historical Society,” the first woman to hold the position. In 1913 Terrell joined the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, which had recently been formed, at Howard University. She was given a degree from Oberlin College in 1948, and an Honorary Degree from Howard and the Universities of Wilberforce.

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Racism in 1920

Racism’s existence is tied not to one’s physical features but the social interpretations of those biological variations between individuals. Since the age of colonization and slavery, racism in the US has been in many respects, been an ugly foundation of America. Legal racism has brought heavy burdens upon Native Americans, Americans in the less developed region of Europe, African Americans, and Latin Americans. European Americans were privileged by statute over time ranging from the 17th century to the 1960s in matters of schooling, taxation, civil rights, residency, possession of the property, and criminal prosecutions. However, many European ethnic groups, including

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Slavery in United States

In the United States,  slavery has been the official institution of human chattel enslavement, since its establishment in 1776 until the Thirteenth Amendment was ratified in 1865, mostly by Africans and African Americans. The whole of European colonization was founded in the Americas. It was taught in British colonies from the beginning of the colonial era, including 13 colonies establishing the United States. The rule recognized a slave as property to be owned, sold or circulated. Slavery continued until 1865 in approximately half of the United States. Slavery has been primarily replaced as an economic framework by sharecropping and conviction

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Brown v. Board of Education

What Was Brown Vs Board Of Education? The case that came to be known as Brown v. Board of Education was the name given to five different cases heard by the U.S. Supreme Court concerning the topic of segregation in public schools. These cases were Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Briggs v. Elliot, Davis v. Board of Education of Prince Edward County (VA.), Bolling v. Sharpe, and Gebhart v. Ethel. While the facts of each case are different, the main issue in each was the constitutionality of state-sponsored segregation in public schools. May 17, 1954 marks a defining moment in the United States.

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Appalling and Disgraceful: How Does This Keep Happening

The video is extremely painful to watch. It’s even harder to hear the cries of Anjanette Young after Chicago Police bashed down her door and conducted a raid.  An unsupervised search warrant based on a false tip led to a scene that once again revealed prejudice, social inequality and has unnerving echoes of Breonna Taylor. Young had gotten home from her job as a social worker and was changing when police barged through her home.  Watching the video, you see police with weapons drawn. They tear through her apartment – and worse, cuff her as she is naked.  They continue

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Educational Inequality in America: Race and Gender

Education Inequality: Definition and Background        Educational Inequality is about the disparity of access to educational resources between different social groups. Some examples of these resources include school funding, experienced and qualified educators, books, technologies and school facilities such as sports and recreation. Educational inequality in America are often the result of some of the following factors: Government policies Choice of school Family wealth Residential location Parenting style and choices Implicit bias towards a student’s race, ethnicity and gender While there are many more factors that contribute to the existence of inequality in the American education system, the broader problems created

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The Free People of Color – Definition, Context and Disambiguation

Very few slave owners engaged in voluntary manumission until the revolution and the Civil War. Many slave owners took advantage of the power dynamics and engaged in sexual relations with their slaves. Sometimes these relationships lasted for extended periods of time. Very frequently, these relationships resulted in the birth of children – most of whom were not usually emancipated in English speaking colonies. However, it was more common in Spanish and French colonies such as those in South America and the Caribbean, for colonial fathers to acknowledge and emancipate children born of relations with African slaves. While there were numerous

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Women’s Suffrage Movement

Most democratic societies, ranging from ancient Greece and Rome to the emerging European democracies of the 18th century, had one thing in common – women were rarely, if ever, allowed to vote. Even when most democracies began to evolve and widen franchise, women were still denied voting rights. This lead to the 19th century movement which would come to be known as the Women’s Suffrage Movement. While the suffrage movement of the United States and the United Kingdom received worldwide attention, these nations were actually late to enfranchise women. By the time the 19th Amendment came to pass in the

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Defining Police Brutality in the U.S

Contrary to popular opinion, police brutality is not a new issue nor is it limited to the United States. It has a long global history. However, the first step in understanding the different aspects of police brutality is defining it. In the American context, Britannica defines it as, ‘the unwarranted or excessive and often illegal use of force against civilians by U.S police officers.’ Actions that may be regarded as police brutality include physical assault and battery, torture, manhandling and murder. However, many consider verbal and physical harassment, threats and false arrests to constitute police brutality as well. On a

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